Teaching and Learning Experience Sharing (TALES) Seminar Series (2015/16 2nd)

2016/17 2nd | 2016/17 1st | 2015/16 2nd | 2015/16 1st | 2014/15 2nd | 2014/15 1st |
2013/14 2nd |2013/14 1st | 2012/13 2nd | 2012/13 1st | 2011/12 2nd | 2011/12 1st | 2010/11 2nd | 2010/11 1st | 2009/10

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Intended Learning Outcomes

At the end of TALES, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the HKBU Graduate Attributes and their importance in the OBTL implementation;
  2. Develop constructively aligned Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs), Teaching and Learning Activities (TLAs) and Assessment Methods (AMs) for their respective courses;
  3. Experiment with new and innovative teaching activities through the deployment of e-learning;

 

Series Outline

TALES Series Date Venue
1. Teaching Statements, Portfolios, and Awards 28 Jan ACC209
2. Enhancing Student Learning in Academic Integrity and Ethics With Augmented Reality Technology 24 Feb ACC209
3. Supporting Students with Special Educational Needs (SEN) 3 Mar AAB402K
4. eLearning Week 15 & 18 Mar ACC209
5. Developing High-achieving Research Postgraduate Students 20 Apr ACC209
6. Learning from Real Work 5 May ACC209
7. The BOLT Roadshow: Blended Learning in Hong Kong 10 May ACC209
8. Enriching Higher Education with Service Learning – the Experience from the School of Chinese Medicine 19 May ACC209
9. Developing a Sustainable Service Learning Programme in Higher Education 8 Jun ACC209
10. Learning with Mobiles – the Challenges and Contradictions 4 Jul ACC209

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TALES 1 – 28 January 2016 (Thursday)

TALES 1 Topic Date Time Venue
1. Teaching Statements, Portfolios, and Awards 28 Jan 12:30 – 2:30 p.m. ACC209
Note: light lunch from 12:15 – 12:30 p.m.
Title: Teaching Statements, Portfolios, and Awards
Facilitator/s:

Professor Brian P. COPPOLA

Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Chemistry
University of Michigan

Biography: Professor Brian P. Coppola is Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Chemistry at the University of Michigan. He serves as the department’s Associate Chair for Educational Development & Practice, which includes directing CSIE|UM, the department’s program for using faculty-led projects as the foundation for educating future faculty (sites.lsa.umich.edu/csie-um). Professor Coppola received his B.S. degree in 1978 from the University of New Hampshire and his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1984. Moving to Ann Arbor in 1986, he joined an active group of faculty in the design and implementation of a revised undergraduate chemistry curriculum. His 1996-7 tenure review established a new policy at the University of Michigan, recognizing discipline-centered teaching and learning as an area that can be represented. He was promoted to Full Professor of Chemistry in 2001-2. His publications range from mechanistic organic chemistry research in 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions to educational philosophy, practice and assessment. Professor Coppola has been recognized for his contributions to higher education, including receiving the Kendall-Hunt Outstanding Undergraduate Science Teacher Award from the Society for College Science Teachers (2003), the State of Michigan Professor of the Year in the CASE/Carnegie US Professor of the Year program (2004), and the American Chemical Society’s James Flack Norris Award (2006). In 2009, he was selected as the CASE/Carnegie US Professor of the Year (for doctoral institutions). In 2012, he received the 2012-14 Robert Foster Cherry Award for Great Teaching.
Abstract: The modern teaching portfolio concept has been around for 20-30 years, popularized in the US through projects run by the now-defunct American Association of Higher Education. There has never been any consensus reached, however, on the assembly and use of teaching portfolios, regardless of how ubiquitous they are.

In this session, I will look at teaching statements and portfolios as a simple and practical problem to solve, and one that can rely on existing faculty skills rather than trying to invent new ones. In short, a teaching statement (I avoid the term ‘philosophy’) is a discipline-centered argument about one’s instructional practices. As with any other professional argument, the statement ought to start with a claim (a thesis) and follow with a coherent text that provides evidence to warrant the claim. The writer needs to keep the reader in mind, particularly in anticipating what the reader will anticipate based on the claim(s) that are made.

A teaching statement can form the foundation for a portfolio, where the artifacts constitute some of the actual evidence described in the statement. The narrative needs to be consistent and coherent, leading the reader from point to point. In assembling portfolios for awards competitions, writers need to identify ideas and practices that set them apart (signature pedagogies) and to provide information that readers immediately want to adopt, adapt, or at least tell someone about.

Time: 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. (light lunch from 12:15 – 12:30 p.m.)
Venue: ACC209
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TALES 2 – 24 February 2016 (Wednesday)

TALES 2 Topic Date Time Venue
1. Enhancing Student Learning in Academic Integrity and Ethics With Augmented Reality Technology 24 Feb 12:30 – 2:30 p.m. ACC209
Note: light lunch from 12:15 – 12:30 p.m.
Title: Enhancing Student Learning in Academic Integrity and Ethics With Augmented Reality Technology
Facilitator/s:

Professor Mark PEGRUM

Graduate School of Education,
the University of Western Australia,
Perth, Australia

Biography: Mark Pegrum is an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Education at The University of Western Australia, where he teaches in the areas of e-learning and mobile learning. His current research focuses on digital literacies, and the learning of language and literacy through mobile technologies. His recent books include “Brave New Classrooms: Democratic Education and the Internet”, co-edited with Joe Lockard, and published by Peter Lang in 2007; “From Blogs to Bombs: The Future of Digital Technologies in Education”, published by UWA Publishing in 2009; “Digital Literacies”, co-authored with Gavin Dudeney and Nicky Hockly, and published by Pearson in 2013; and “Mobile Learning: Languages, Literacies and Cultures”, published by Palgrave Macmillan. He currently teaches in Perth, Hong Kong and Singapore, and has given presentations and run seminars on e-learning in Australia and New Zealand, East and Southeast Asia, the UK and Europe, and South America.
Abstract: Advances in technology always bring about new opportunities in education. With the proliferation of smartphones and other smart mobile devices, teachers can design more interactive teaching and learning activities to engage students in learning within and beyond the classroom.

In this workshop, an overview of mobile augmented reality technology in tertiary education will be presented. This introduction will then be followed by HKBU case sharing on using an augmented reality application to help students grasp the concept of academic integrity and ethics in different subject disciplines. This research has been developed under the inter-institutional AIE-AR project funded by the University Grants Committee. This HKBU-led project was recently named the “Silver Winner for the category of Regional Award Asia” at the second Wharton-QS Stars Reimagine Education Awards 2015. For details of the AIE-AR project, please visit: http://ar-learn.com/.

Time: 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. (light lunch from 12:15 – 12:30 p.m.)
Venue: ACC209
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TALES 3 – 3 March 2016 (Thursday)

TALES 3 Topic Date Time Venue
1. Supporting Students with Special Educational Needs (SEN) 3 Mar 12:45 – 2:15 p.m. AAB402K
Note: light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.
Title: Supporting Students with Special Education Needs (SEN)
Facilitator/s:

Dr Eva SUM

HK EP Services Centre Limited

Biography: Dr. Eva Sum is a Chartered Educational Psychologist of British Psychological Society and a Registered Educational Psychologist of Hong Kong Psychological Society. As a Specialist (Educational Psychology) in the Education Bureau (EDB) for over 15 years and subsequently a teaching consultant in the University of Hong Kong until 2010, she has extensive clinical experience working with children and adolescents with different learning and psycho-emotional needs. Her specialty areas include gifted and talented, twice exceptionality, ASD and mental health issues. In addition to her current capacity as an Educational Psychologist in the HK EP Services Centre Limited, Dr. Sum also works as a professional supervisor of educational psychology services in a number of local schools.
Abstract: The last workshop offered in October 2015 provided a good introduction of how the Hong Kong education system supports students with special educational needs (SSEN) and the strategies for assisting students with visual and hearing impairment in learning. In view of the high demand for similar sharing sessions, this workshop will provide a brief overview of different types of SSEN, followed by in-depth discussion on the teaching strategy to support students with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (E.g. Asperger Syndrome), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Local and overseas examples will be used to illustrate how the support services could be taken as references.

For details of support services offered to SSEN at HKBU, please visit: http://sa.hkbu.edu.hk/home/campus-life-support/welfare-and-services/services-for-students-with-disabilities/

Time: 12:45 to 2:15 p.m. (light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.)
Venue: AAB402K
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TALES 4 – eLearning Week

eLearning Week Date Time Venue
1. Enhancing Student Engagement Using Personal Response Systems (PRS) 15 Mar 12:45 – 2:15 p.m. ACC209
2. E-Resources at HKBU and Turnitin 18 Mar 12:45 – 2:15 p.m. ACC209
Note: light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.
Synopsis: In an attempt to cultivate an accommodative learning environment for our students who were brought up in a digital-rich society, a number of University-wide e-tools are deployed to facilitate teaching and student learning at HKBU. In the upcoming eLearning week, we are going to go through some of the common e-tools adopted by teachers and students, and to explore how the e-tools can be deployed, beyond their basic functions, to help students learn more effectively. These sessions aim to encourage teachers to design relevant teaching and learning activities to facilitate student achievement of the 7 Graduate Attributes (GAs), particularly ethics (Citizenship) and information literacy and IT skills (Skills).

Session 1 – 15 March 2016 (Tuesday)

Title: Enhancing Student Engagement Using Personal Response Systems (PRS)
Facilitator/s: Dr Vincent LEUNG (MKT)
Dr Lisa LAW (CHTL)
Mr Kendall YAN (CHTL)
Abstract: In this workshop, the experiences in using Personal Response Systems (PRS) (e.g. iQlickers, Qualtrics, Kahoot) to engage student learning will be shared. These tools are either publicly available or standard provision in the University. Our facilitators will demonstrate how to adopt the tools for game-based learning and formative assessment, followed by the sharing on the effective use of those tools to engage students in discussion and other learning activities. An example from the School of Business in using PRS to engage two different groups of students, one from HKBU and the other group from a Singapore University, through the video conferencing technology will also be showcased.

Remark: Please bring along your mobile phone with you to the workshop.

Time: 12:45 to 2:15 p.m. (light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.)
Venue: ACC209
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Session 2 – 18 March 2016 (Friday)

Title: E-Resources at HKBU and Turnitin
Facilitator/s: Mr Chris CHAN (LIB)
Ms Angela NG (LC)
Abstract: This workshop will first introduce the rich variety of e-resources available from the University Library, and then detail strategies for ensuring your students make good use of them. In the second part of the session, we will introduce Turnitin. This web-based e-tool has been adopted at HKBU as a software tool to help educate students about plagiarism and check their work. The basic functions of this e-tool (e.g. creating an assignment, interpreting the originality report, etc.) will be covered, and further discussion will address how Turnitin can be used to promote student learning in a formative process, in conjunction with the University’s guidelines for using plagiarism prevention software.
Time: 12:45 to 2:15 p.m. (light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.)
Venue: ACC209
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TALES 5 – 20 April 2016 (Wednesday)

TALES 5 Topic Date Time Venue
1. Developing High-achieving Research Postgraduate Students 6 Apr Cancelled 12:30 – 2:15 p.m. ACC209
20 Apr
Note: light lunch from 12:15 – 12:30 p.m.
Title: Developing High-achieving Research Postgraduate Students
Speaker/s: Professor Eva MAN (Executive Associate Dean, Graduate School)
Professor Terry YIP (ARTS)
Professor Colin SPARKS (COMM)
Professor Kok Wai CHEAH (SCI)
Dr Shi Ping ZHANG (SCM)
Professor Patrick LAU (SOSC)
Abstract: Due to the particular nature of instruction and guidance, research supervision is considered as one of the most intensive form of teaching in higher education. It is a challenging task to nurture high-achieving research postgraduate students as their learning needs and professional skills required of them could be quite different from undergraduate or taught postgraduate students. In this workshop series, academic colleagues from different subject disciplines will be invited to share their experience in supervising research students, as well as developing them into future teachers and researchers, from proposal stage to graduation. Governance structure for research student supervision at HKBU, relevant regulations and guidelines, as well as the role of supervisors will also be introduced and discussed in the sessions. For better exchange and cross-unit experience sharing, different Faculties/Schools/Academy are grouped into two sessions. Colleagues are welcome to attend any session(s) as they see fit.

These sessions aim to inspire teachers to facilitate their research postgraduate students to achieve the Graduate Attributes (GAs) “Learning”, i.e. an on-going interest in exploring new areas of research.

Time: 12:30 to 2:15 p.m. (light lunch from 12:15 – 12:30 p.m.)
Venue: ACC209
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TALES 6 – 5 May 2016 (Thursday)

TALES 6 Topic Date Time Venue
1. Learning from Real Work 5 May 12:45 – 2:15 p.m. ACC209
Note: light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.
Title: Learning from Real Work
Facilitator/s:

Professor Brian P. COPPOLA
Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Chemistry
University of Michigan

Biography: Professor Brian P. Coppola is Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Chemistry at the University of Michigan. He serves as the department’s Associate Chair for Educational Development & Practice, which includes directing CSIE|UM, the department’s program for using faculty-led projects as the foundation for educating future faculty (sites.lsa.umich.edu/csie-um). Professor Coppola received his B.S. degree in 1978 from the University of New Hampshire and his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1984. Moving to Ann Arbor in 1986, he joined an active group of faculty in the design and implementation of a revised undergraduate chemistry curriculum. His 1996-7 tenure review established a new policy at the University of Michigan, recognizing discipline-centered teaching and learning as an area that can be represented. He was promoted to Full Professor of Chemistry in 2001-2. His publications range from mechanistic organic chemistry research in 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions to educational philosophy, practice and assessment. Professor Coppola has been recognized for his contributions to higher education, including receiving the Kendall-Hunt Outstanding Undergraduate Science Teacher Award from the Society for College Science Teachers (2003), the American Chemical Society’s James Flack Norris Award (2006), and the CASE/Carnegie Professor of the Year (State of Michigan, 2004; US National, doctoral institutions, 2009). In 2012, he received the 2012-14 Robert Foster Cherry Award for Great Teaching. He was named as an ACS Fellow (2015) and a State of Michigan Distinguished Professor (2016).
Abstract: “Real Work” principles are a way to think about designing assignments that feature one or more of the following strategies: (a) use of authentic sources; (b) balance of team and individual work; (c) peer presentation, review and critique; (d) integration of student-generated instructional materials; (e) student use of instructional technologies; and (f) a balance of convergent and divergent tasks. In this talk, Professor Coppola will combine examples of classroom and student work with some of the results from studying student learning.

This workshop aims to encourage teachers to design relevant teaching and learning and assessment activities to facilitate and evaluate student achievement of the 7 Graduate Attributes (GAs), particularly “Knowledge”, “Learning” and “Skills”.

Time: 12:45 to 2:15 p.m. (light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.)
Venue: ACC209
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TALES 7 – 10 May 2016 (Tuesday)

TALES 7 Topic Date Time Venue
1. The BOLT Roadshow: Blended Learning in Hong Kong 10 May 12:45 – 2:15 p.m. ACC209
Note: light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.
Title: The BOLT Roadshow: Blended Learning in Hong Kong
Facilitator/s: Dr Darren BRYANT
Assistant Professor,
Department of Education Policy and Leadership,
The Hong Kong Institute of Education

Mr Darren HARBUTT
Co-project Leader of the BOLT
Educational Development Officer,
Educational Development Centre,
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Mr Peter BIRCH
Language Instructor,
English Language Centre,
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Biography: Dr Darren BRYANT
Darren Bryant is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Education Policy and Leadership at the Hong Kong Institute of Education. He holds concurrent positions as Associate Director of the Asia Pacific Centre for Leadership and Change, Managing Editor of the Journal of Educational Administration, and Programme Coordinator of the Executive Master of Arts in International Educational Leadership and Change—an online programme.  Prior to completing his PhD at the University of Hong Kong, he served for 12 years as a social sciences teacher, head of department, and curriculum leader.  These positions provided practical experience is leading teams involved in school-based curriculum development, program design and evaluation, and whole school improvement. Darren’s research areas include international school leadership, middle leadership, school leaders’ roles in policy enactment, and leader development. 

Mr Darren HARBUTT
Darren Harbutt is an Educational Development Officer in the Educational Development Centre of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. Before this he worked as an Instructional Designer at the University of Hong Kong. Darren has worked in education for over 20 years and in the last few years he has also helped to design, build and run MOOCs. Darren is co-Project Leader of the BOLT Project.

Mr Peter BIRCH

Peter Birch is originally from the UK and he has been an English language teacher for more than 30 years. He holds an MA in English Language Teaching and has taught in Greece, Thailand, Cambodia and Hong Kong. His professional interests include English language testing, and genre analysis. When he has free time he enjoys reading, cooking, and travelling.

Abstract: The Blended & Online Learning & Teaching (BOLT) Project is a UGC-funded collaboration in which participating Hong Kong tertiary institutions look at developing online teaching and learning in Hong Kong. The project includes multiple different approaches, ranging from initiatives within a particular institution – such as Hong Kong Institute of Education’s grassroots approach to developing blended learning in a faculty, and Baptist University’s Faculty Professional Development Series of workshops – to more central elements, such as the BOLT foundation course, led by Polytechnic University and open to teachers from all participating universities. More information available at http://www.bolt.edu.hk

In this seminar, Dr Darren Bryant and Mr Darren Harbutt will lead presentations on the BOLT project so far, sharing success stories, reporting on upcoming events and offering an opportunity to engage in discussion about blended learning in a Hong Kong context.

Time: 12:45 to 2:15 p.m. (light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.)
Venue: ACC209
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TALES 8 – 19 May 2016 (Thursday)

TALES 8 Topic Date Time Venue
1. Enriching Higher Education with Service Learning – the Experience from the School of Chinese Medicine 19 May 12:45 – 2:15 p.m. ACC209
Note: light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.
Title: Enriching Higher Education with Service Learning – the Experience from the School of Chinese Medicine
Speaker/s: Professor Zhang Hong Qi (SCM)
Abstract: Learning from services provides students with vivid learning experiences to facilitate their development of various skills in line with our Graduate Attributes (GAs), particularly citizenship, creativity, communication and teamwork skills. To realize the intended outcome of our Vision 2020 to offer more service learning opportunities to students, some programmes have incorporated the service learning elements into their formal curriculum. School of Chinese Medicine is one of the good examples exemplifying the practice, in particular they have also established a Community of Practice (CoP) to carry out a great variety of meaningful activities (http://chtl.hkbu.edu.hk/main/cop-ga/). To sustain and to make it better, recently the CoP has visited their Taiwan counterparts to exchange the experience in general education and service learning. In this workshop, Professor Zhang Hong Qi (SCM) and other colleagues will share their experience of sustaining a CoP, as well as what they learnt from the Taiwan counterparts.

This workshop aims to discuss how to incorporate service learning elements into our professional courses or programmes, and how to facilitate student achievement of our GAs.

Time: 12:45 to 2:15 p.m. (light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.)
Venue: ACC209
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TALES 9 – 8 June 2016 (Wednesday)

TALES 9 Topic Date Time Venue
1. Developing a Sustainable Service Learning Programme in Higher Education 8 Jun 12:30 – 2:30 p.m. ACC209
Note: light lunch from 12:15 – 12:30 p.m.
Title: Developing a Sustainable Service Learning Programme in Higher Education
Facilitator/s: Dr Robert SHUMER
Founding Director of the National Service-Learning Clearinghouse,
Former co-director of the Center for Experiential Education and Service-Learning, University of Minnesota
Biography: Dr Robert Shumer has been involved in education for almost 50 years. He has taught from middle school through graduate school and conducted research in many areas, from service learning, to teacher education, to character education, to career and technical education, to civic engagement, to participatory evaluation. He served as the founding director of the National Service-Learning Clearinghouse at the University of Minnesota and internal evaluator for the National Research Center for Career and Technical Education (NRCCTE). He also served as Director of Field Studies at UCLA and Vice Chair of the International Association for Research on Service-learning and Community Engagement. He has published more than 85 articles, book chapters, and even a few books on service learning, youth-led participatory evaluation, CTE, teacher education, and community-based learning. He is considered one of the pioneers for modern service learning in the United States.
Abstract: This presentation will cover issues of developing sustainable service learning programmes in higher education. It will involve discussion of faculty roles and development, as well as student/community member participation and engagement. It will also include discussion of the role of evaluation as a key component of improving quality and institutionalization of service learning as a viable programme to accomplish the goals of the university.
Time: 12:30 to 2:30p.m. (light lunch from 12:15 – 12:30 p.m.)
Venue: ACC209
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TALES 10 – 4 July 2016 (Monday)

TALES 10 Topic Date Time Venue
1. Learning with Mobiles – the Challenges and Contradictions 4 Jul 3:30 – 5:00 p.m. ACC209
Title: Learning with Mobiles – the Challenges and Contradictions
Facilitator/s: Professor John TRAXLER
Research Professor of Digital Learning
Institute of Education
University of Wolverhampton
Biography: Professor John Traxler was Professor of Mobile Learning, the world’s first, since September 2009, and is now Research Professor of Digital Learning in the Institute of Education at the University of Wolverhampton UK. He is one of the pioneers of mobile learning and has been associated with mobile learning projects since 2001 when he was evaluator for m-learning, the first major EU project. He is a Founding Director and current Vice-President of the International Association for Mobile Learning, responsible for the annual international mLearn research conference running since 2002. He is co-editor of the definitive book, Mobile Learning: A Handbook for Educators and Trainers, and Mobile Learning: the Next Generation with Professor Agnes Kukulska-Hulme. He is also co-author of Mobilizing Mathematics: Case Studies of Mobile Learning being used in Mathematics Education and Mobile Learning and STEM: Case Studies in Practice, and has written many papers and chapters on all aspects of mobile learning. He sits on various editorial boards.

Please click here for full biography of Professor John Traxler.

Abstract: Learning with Mobiles now has a history of twenty years, a mature research community and a wealth of pilots and projects scattered around the global in different communities and countries. It does, however, stand at a cross-roads caught between societal, demographic and epistemological trends and forces that take it in new directions and institutional, educational and professional forces and trends that might soon bear fruit. In this seminar, we will explore such issues that can be framed in some respects as tensions between informal and formal, local and global, modern and post-modern. The impact of mobile learning to the entire education sector will also be discussed.
Time: 3:30 to 5:00p.m.
Venue: ACC209
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