Teaching and Learning Experience Sharing (TALES) Seminar Series (2016/17 2nd)

2017/18 1st | 2016/17 2nd | 2016/17 1st | 2015/16 2nd | 2015/16 1st | 2014/15 2nd | 2014/15 1st2013/14 2nd | 2013/14 1st | 2012/13 2nd | 2012/13 1st | 2011/12 2nd |
2011/12 1st 2010/11 2nd | 2010/11 1st | 2009/10

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Intended Learning Outcomes

At the end of TALES, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the HKBU Graduate Attributes and their importance in the OBTL implementation;
  2. Develop constructively aligned Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs), Teaching and Learning Activities (TLAs) and Assessment Methods (AMs) for their respective courses;
  3. Experiment with new and innovative teaching activities through the deployment of eLearning;

 

Series Outline

TALES Series Date Venue
1. Internationalization at HKBU: Experience Sharing 17 Feb ACC209
2. Internationalization at Home (IaH): Current and future directions 22 Feb ACC209
3. Using Flipped-classroom to Enhance Students’ Thinking in a GE course: Lessons Learned (Full) 28 Feb ACC209
4. Learning to Serve, Serving to Learn — A Journey through Academic Service-learning 8 Mar ACC209
5. Beyond Mobility: Internationalizing the ‘at home’ Curriculum 16 Mar ACC209
6. Making General Education Important in the Eyes of Students 21 Mar ACC209
7a. Dialogue about innovation in teaching and learning in high performing universities 28 Mar ACC209
7b. Flat space, deep learning 29 Mar SCC 2/F
8. Teaching Excellence @ HKBU: Exemplary Teaching Practice Maximising Student Learning Experience 11 Apr ACC209
9. Enriching Student Learning Experience through Academic Advising and Mentoring (AAM) – Roundtable Discussion 5 May ACC209
10. Sharing on Recruitment Strategies and Outcome Based Learning Experience for RPg Students 9 May ACC209
11. Supporting Students with High Functioning Autism (HFA) 16 May WLB211
12. The Arrival of Mobile Augmented Reality (AR) Learning in Asia 24 May ACC209

 

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TALES 1 – 17 February 2017 (Friday)

TALES 1 Topic Date Time Venue
1. Internationalization at HKBU: Experience Sharing 17 Feb 12:45 – 2:15 p.m. ACC209
Note: light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.
Title: Internationalization at HKBU: Experience Sharing
Facilitator/s: Dr Albert CHAU (VPTL)
Dr Tushar CHAUDHURI (GIS)
Dr Noel SIU (MKT)
Abstract: With “Internationalization” being a strategic focus of Hong Kong Baptist University, we are pleased to kick-off the TALES series in Semester 2, AY2016/17 with this pertinent topic.

We are pleased to have invited two colleagues, Dr Tushar Chaudhuri and Dr Noel Siu to jointly facilitate this session with Dr Albert Chau, our VPTL. Dr Siu, Associate Professor, Department of Marketing, is the Programme Director for Master of Science in Global Marketing Management. Dr Chaudhuri, Assistant Professor, Department of Government & International Studies, is the Programme Coordinator of European Studies, and also the External Relations Coordinator of the Faculty of Social Sciences. Together, they will share with us their practical experiences in working towards internationalization in their specific areas, and discuss the way forward for HKBU.

Dr Siu will share her valuable programme development experience working on the joint award Master programme with their overseas partner, the University of Sheffield in the UK. The impact and benefit of this kind of collaboration has strengthened the working relationship between the Department of Marketing and other overseas universities like the University of Grenoble in France.

Dr Chaudhuri will share his valuable practical experience in the European Studies Programme on preparing students for international mobility, internationalizing the curriculum and internationalization at home using e-learning pedagogies.

Time: 12:45 to 2:15 p.m. (light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.)
Venue: ACC209
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TALES 2 – 22 February 2017 (Wednesday)

TALES 2 Topic Date Time Venue
1. Internationalization at Home (IaH): Current and future directions 22 Feb 12:45 – 2:15 p.m. ACC209
Note: light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.
Title: Internationalization at Home (IaH): Current and future directions
Facilitator/s: Professor Jane JACKSON (CUHK, ENG)
Abstract: With accelerating globalization, institutions of higher education in Hong Kong are being called upon to increase participation rates in study abroad programs and to internationalize their curricula on their home campus. The latter is especially important as it is not feasible to arrange international experience for all students. Swelling the number of incoming international exchange students is also not enough for local institutions to fully achieve the common aims of internationalization as researchers have discovered that interventions may be necessary to promote meaningful intercultural interactions.

After reviewing the University Grant Council’s internationalization aspirations, this presentation will present evolving definitions and understandings of internationalization at home (IaH) and provide examples of IaH activities and initiatives in Europe, North America, and Asia. The remainder of this interactive session will focus on constructive ways in which local institutions can infuse an international dimension into their curricula and practices (both in and outside classrooms).

Biography: Jane Jackson (PhD, U of Toronto) is Professor of Applied Linguistics in the English Department at the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK). Her research centers on study abroad, intercultural communication, language and identity, eLearning, and internationalization. She is the recipient of CUHK’s 2013 Education Award and the UGC’s 2016-17 ‘Prestigious Fellowship under the Humanities and Social Science Scheme’ (HSSPFS). Recent books include Introducing Language and Intercultural Communication (Routledge, 2014), The Routledge Handbook of Language and Intercultural Communication (2012, Editor), Intercultural Journeys: From Study to Residence Abroad (Palgrave MacMillan, 2010), and Language, Identity, and Study Abroad: Sociocultural Perspectives (Equinox, 2008).
Time: 12:45 to 2:15 p.m. (light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.)
Venue: ACC209
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TALES 3 – 28 February 2017 (Tuesday) (Full)

TALES 3 Topic Date Time Venue
1. Using Flipped-classroom to Enhance Students’ Thinking in a GE course: Lessons Learned 28 Feb 12:45 – 2:15 p.m. ACC209
Note: light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.
Title: Using Flipped-classroom to Enhance Students’ Thinking in a GE course: Lessons Learned
Facilitator/s: Dr William CHEUNG (COMP)
Abstract: Flipped-classroom is a new pedagogical approach commonly adopted in local and overseas universities. Unlike the traditional way of teaching, flipped-classroom emphasizes learner-centred approach and active learning, whereby students will go through course-related materials, often online and in the form of short videos, before classes. In-class time can therefore be reserved for in-depth discussion and interactive teaching and learning activities that can facilitate students to develop other skills (e.g. problem solving, teamwork skills, etc.). At HKBU, teachers start trying out flipped-classroom in their courses in line with the global trend. In this workshop, Dr Cheung will share his team experience in adopting this blended learning concept in a GE course. In addition to positive student feedback and its remarkable merits for team teaching, he will also share with us lessons he learned from conducting this kind of new approach of teaching together with other opportunities in the process of implementing flipped-classroom in the University.
Time: 12:45 to 2:15 p.m. (light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.)
Venue: ACC209
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TALES 4 – 8 March 2017 (Wednesday)

TALES 4 Topic Date Time Venue
1. Learning to Serve, Serving to Learn — A Journey through Academic Service-learning 8 Mar 12:45 – 2:15 p.m. ACC209
Note: light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.
Title: Learning to Serve, Serving to Learn — A Journey through Academic Service-learning
Facilitator/s: Dr Stephen CHAN (Office of Service-Learning, PolyU)
Dr Grace NGAI (Office of Service-Learning, PolyU)
Abstract: A university’s mission is to prepare students to become responsible, productive members of society. Society invests in its own future by educating its citizens through the university. For both reasons, it makes sense for university students to be engaged in and learn from society.
Service-learning is an experiential learning pedagogy that educates students about a social issue, brings them out to address those challenges using their classroom-learned skills, and teaches them to reflect and learn from their experiences. It is at once challenging and rewarding for both teacher and student. However, questions still persist: how does one manage a service-learning course? How does one assess it? Does it make sense for students to be required to do community service? Will it detract from the “survival” issues of research, promotion and retention?
In this talk, we will share some of the experiences that we have had with (1) designing and teaching our own course; (2) supporting and coordinating the 50+courses that are delivered at PolyU every year; (3) conducting research into and facilitated through service-learning.
Biography: Dr Grace Ngai and Dr Stephen Chan were the recipients of the UGC Award for Teaching 2016 (team) and the PolyU President’s Award for Services (2016).
Grace graduated from Brown University and Johns Hopkins University in the US and is currently Associate Professor in the Department of Computing at Hong Kong Polytechnic University, and Associate Head of the Office of Service-Learning. She is also the founding coordinator of the Subcommittee for Service-Learning Subjects, which oversees the approval and offering of all SL subjects, and the co-facilitator of the Community of Practice on Service-learning.
Dr Stephen Chan received his PhD in Electrical Engineering from The University of Rochester in the USA in 1987. He then worked for Neo-Visuals in Toronto, and the National Research Council of Canada in Ottawa. He is the founding and current Head of the Office of Service-Learning at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
At PolyU, Grace and Stephen have successfully pioneered a number of teaching initiatives, one of the most prominent being service-learning (SL). They have brought students on service projects in Hong Kong, the Chinese mainland, Cambodia and Rwanda. They proposed one of the first SL subjects at PolyU, and they play key roles in the effort to support and promote PolyU’s SL initiative. Through numerous T&L projects, they have initiated workshops, seminars and salons on topics in offering, assessing and conducting scholarly work in service-learning. From 6 subjects and 200 students in 2012, as of 2016, OSL coordinates the development and offering of 60 service-learning subjects and numerous projects across the university for 4,000+ students each year. These include many projects in Hong Kong, as well as 20+ projects in mainland China, Cambodia, Vietnam, Indonesia, Myanmar, Rwanda and Kyrgyzstan.
Time: 12:45 to 2:15 p.m. (light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.)
Venue: ACC209
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TALES 5 – 16 March 2017 (Thursday)

TALES 5 Topic Date Time Venue
1. Beyond Mobility: Internationalizing the ‘at home’ Curriculum 16 Mar 12:45 – 2:15 p.m. ACC209
Note: light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.
Title: Beyond Mobility: Internationalizing the ‘at home’ Curriculum
Facilitator/s: Dr Susan BRIDGES (Faculty of Education, HKU)
Abstract: Whilst mobility of staff and students remains a core and powerful learning component of internationalization initiatives, in this presentation, I will focus on the ‘at home’ curriculum and examine how embedding internationalization through shared, collaborative projects can support student learning outcomes and faculty development. I will share my experiences with two initiatives in embedding an international perspective in undergraduate professional programmes in Education and Dentistry at The University of Hong Kong. Over the past years, our teams’ collective efforts have focused on addressing larger University missions and graduate attributes of ‘global citizenship’ and ‘intercultural competence’ through collaborative projects addressing course and programme-level learning outcomes. Finally, in reviewing both initiatives, I will examine both the conceptual and practical considerations for designing and implementing internationalization projects that position a global perspective within the ‘at home’ curriculum.
Biography: Dr Susan Bridges is an Associate Professor and Assistant Dean (Curriculum Innovation) with the Faculty of Education and the Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning (CETL), Honorary Associate Professor with BIHMSE at the LKS Faculty of Medicine at The University of Hong Kong (HKU) and Adjunct Professor at the Australian Catholic University. She is an award-winning educator (HKU 2012; QS Wharton 2016) and leads curriculum re-design and staff development projects in higher education. She is the principal investigator of 4 HKSAR General Research Fund (GRF) grants and currently collaborates with researchers in the US and Finland on internationally funded research exploring the ‘how’ of effective pedagogy and clinical communication through interactional and ethnographic approaches. She has published 3 co-edited books, 2 Special Issues; 12 chapters and over 40 journal articles. In addition to serving on the editorial boards for several international journals, she reviews grants for international funds and is invited to speak at international research and teaching innovation meetings. In 2016, Dr Bridges joined the U21 Education Innovation cluster Steering Group to further support innovation across the network, including internationalization of the curriculum.
Time: 12:45 to 2:15 p.m. (light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.)
Venue: ACC209
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TALES 6 – 21 March 2017 (Tuesday)

TALES 6 Topic Date Time Venue
1. Making General Education Important in the Eyes of Students 21 Mar 12:45 – 2:15 p.m. ACC209
Note: light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.
Title: Making General Education Important in the Eyes of Students
Facilitator/s: Professor LEUNG Mei Yee
(Director of University General Education,CUHK)
Abstract: Most students come to university to study their chosen discipline. How can we convince them university learning is also about broadening perspective and human flourishing? The task is all the more difficult in a modern research university where general education is often relegated to a marginal position. Drawing from her experience, the speaker will share possible ways to make general education relevant to student needs, which include setting high expectation, enhancing skills essential for student success, and giving adequate support to help students go beyond their comfort zone. General education can gain students’ respect when they find the GE courses can be mind changing, if not life changing.
Biography: Leung Mei Yee graduated from the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) and gained her Mâtrise and Docteur-en-Histoire from Université de Paris I (Panthéon-Sorbonne) in France. She has served the Office of University General Education in CUHK since 1999, Associate Director from 1999 to 2012, and Director since 2012. The General Education Foundation (GEF) team she led has been awarded in 2015 AGLS Exemplary Program Award for Improvement of General Education, and in 2016 UGC Teaching Award for teaching excellence.
Time: 12:45 to 2:15 p.m. (light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.)
Venue: ACC209
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TALES 7 – 28 & 29 March 2017

TALES 7 Topic Date Time Venue
1. Dialogue about innovation in teaching and learning in high performing universities 28 Mar 12:45 – 2:15 p.m.* ACC209
2. Flat space, deep learning 29 Mar 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. SCC 2/F
* Note: light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.

 

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TALES 7a – 28 March 2017 (Tuesday)
Title: Dialogue about innovation in teaching and learning in high performing universities
Facilitator/s: Dr Angélica NATERA
(Executive Director of LASPAU)
Abstract: When talking about innovation in education, we always think of technology, eLearning, new pedagogical designs, etc. Is that all? In this workshop, we shall discuss the issue by going through some examples of how high performing universities interpret “innovation”. We will also discuss how “innovation” can facilitate student learning in the classroom of the twenty-first century.
Biography: Dr Angélica Natera is the Executive Director of LASPAU, a Harvard University affiliated organization. Angélica brings over twenty years of experience working in the design, development and management of educational programs for public and private universities, government agencies, private companies and non-profit organizations in Latin America, Spain and the United States. In her previous role as LASPAU’s deputy director, Angélica oversaw the Initiative for the Development of Academic Innovation (IDIA) as well as the organization’s administration of various scholarship programs including the Fulbright Foreign Student program, Science without Borders, the Organization of American States (OAS) Scholarship Programs, and national scholarship programs of Colombia, El Salvador, and Peru. Angélica joined LASPAU in 2001, and led the development and launch of IDIA in 2006 through which LASPAU has benefitted hundreds of faculty and academic leaders in the region. She was awarded the 2010–2011 Harvard University Administrative Fellowship.
Time: 12:45 to 2:15 p.m. (light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.)
Venue: ACC209
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TALES 7b – 29 March 2017 (Wednesday)
Title: Flat space, deep learning
Facilitator/s: Professor Eric MAZUR
(Balkanski Professor of Physics and Applied Physics, Harvard University)
Abstract: The discussion will focus on how we can give students ownership of their learning using a team-based, project-based approach. This new approach has no standard lectures or exams, yet students’ conceptual gains are significantly greater than those obtained in traditional courses. As an example, Eric Mazur’s course at Harvard blends six best practices to deliver a learning experience that helps students develop important skills, including communication, estimation, problem solving, and team skills, in addition to a solid conceptual understanding of the material. In this session, we will discuss the course philosophy and pedagogical approach and participants will take part in a variety of scaffolded exercises, including a new form of collaborative assessment.
Biography: Professor Eric Mazur is the Balkanski Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at Harvard University. As an internationally recognized scientist and researcher, Professor Mazur leads a vigorous research program in optical physics and supervises one of the largest research groups in the Physics Department at Harvard University. In addition to his work in optical physics, Professor Mazur is interested in education, science policy, outreach, and the public perception of science. He believes that better science education for all – not just science majors – is vital for continued scientific progress. To this end, Professor Mazur devotes part of his research group’s effort to education research and finding verifiable ways to improve science education. In 1990 he began developing Peer Instruction a method for teaching large lecture classes interactively. Professor Mazur’s teaching method has developed a large following, both nationally and internationally, and has been adopted across many science disciplines. Mazur is Chairman of the Instructional Strategy Advisory Group for Turning Technologies, a company developing interactive response systems for the education market.

Professor Mazur is author or co-author of 219 scientific publications and 12 patents. He has also written on education and is the author of Peer Instruction: A User’s Manual (Prentice Hall, 1997), a book that explains how to teach large lecture classes interactively. In 2006 he helped produce the award-winning DVD Interactive Teaching.

Time: 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Venue: SCC 2/F
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TALES 8 – 11 April 2017 (Tuesday)

TALES 8 Topic Date Time Venue
1. Teaching Excellence @ HKBU: Exemplary Teaching Practice Maximising Student Learning Experience 11 Apr 12:45 – 2:15 p.m. ACC209
Note: light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.
Title: Teaching Excellence @ HKBU: Exemplary Teaching Practice Maximising Student Learning Experience
Facilitator/s: Dr Glos HO (MKT)
Dr Krzysztof SLIWINSKI (GIS)
Dr TU Feng (SCM)
Abstract: There are lots of inspiring stories to tell how dedicated teachers at HKBU enhance student learning experience through their exemplary teaching practices. Every year, we are honoured to have invited some of our excellent teachers in the TALES workshop series to share ways to stimulate student learning, design innovative teaching and learning activities and assessment method to assess student achievements.

In this session, three awardees of our President’s Awards for Outstanding Performance in Teaching will talk about their teaching pedagogies and share tips on engaging student learning. They all share a common belief – student learning should not be necessarily restricted to the classroom environment. Co-curricular and extra-curricular activities are of equal importance for helping students develop the HKBU graduate attributes.

Time: 12:45 to 2:15 p.m. (light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.)
Venue: ACC209
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TALES 9 – 5 May 2017 (Friday)

TALES 9 Topic Date Time Venue
1. Enriching Student Learning Experience through Academic Advising and Mentoring (AAM) – Roundtable Discussion 5 May 12:45 – 2:15 p.m. ACC209
Note: light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.
Title: Enriching Student Learning Experience through Academic Advising and Mentoring (AAM) – Roundtable Discussion
Facilitator/s: Dr William CHEUNG (Associate Head, COMP)
Mr C K LAU (Associate Dean, COMM)
Professor Sandy LI (Associate Dean, SOSC)
Professor Johnny POON (Associate Dean, ARTS)
Abstract: Our University has always been commended for providing a caring environment for our students to achieve better learning. In addition to the services offered by related teaching and learning support units, AAM is highly recognised as one of the most effective and helpful means to provide students with both academic guidance and social support, particularly those new ones to the University community.

AAM at HKBU had been evolving progressively over the past few years in line with the change of student needs following the implementation of the 4-year programme.The role of AAM in supporting students has become even more important, coupling with the surge in the intake of senior year entry students who are expected to complete their studies within a 2-year period. In this session, academic advisors from different units will share their exemplary practices in providing pastoral care for students in different years of studies through AAM. The discussion will also centre on how the University can further refine its AAM framework with a goal to satisfy the diverse learning needs of our students.

Time: 12:45 to 2:15 p.m. (light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.)
Venue: ACC209
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TALES 10 – 9 May 2017 (Tuesday)

TALES 10 Topic Date Time Venue
1. Sharing on Recruitment Strategies and Outcome Based Learning Experience for RPg Students 9 May 12:45 – 2:15 p.m. ACC209
Note: light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.
Title: Sharing on Recruitment Strategies and Outcome Based Learning Experience for RPg Students
Facilitator/s: Dr Henry FOCK (Associate Professor, MKT)
Professor Patrick WC LAU (Professor, PE)
Professor Eva MAN (Executive Associate Dean, GS)
Professor NG Kwok Po (Chair Professor, MATH)
Dr Eva WONG (Director, CHTL)
Abstract: To most research postgraduate (RPg) students, the few years of research studies and learning experience in the University is of vital importance to determine their future and career. To this end, HKBU endeavours to assure that our RPg students can receive quality education and research supervision. This workshop provides a sharing opportunity for experienced research supervisors from different subject disciplines to talk about the integration of outcome based approach and different learning activities into the programme design to enrich student learning, meeting the high-achieving learning goals and the graduate attributes. Good strategies on recruiting and attracting elite RPg students over the globe to pursue their studies at HKBU will also be discussed.
Time: 12:45 to 2:15 p.m. (light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.)
Venue: ACC209
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TALES 11 – 16 May 2017 (Tuesday)

TALES 11 Topic Date Time Venue
1. Supporting Students with High Functioning Autism (HFA) 16 May 12:45 – 2:15 p.m. WLB211
Note: light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.
Title: Supporting Students with High Functioning Autism (HFA)
Facilitator/s: Dr Joanne WONG
(Clinical Psychologist,SAHK 香港耀能協會)
Ms Agnes CHAN
(Registered Social Worker,SAHK香港耀能協會)
Abstract: Statistical data shows that a growing number of students with HFA can now receive tertiary education in developed countries. Individual with autism spectrum disorder can be misunderstood as disorganized, impolite and uncooperative. There are many challenges that have to be surmounted in order to achieve success in higher education. Understanding from others, provision of appropriate educational support and effective interventions can facilitate their path to success in academic area and career.

In this seminar, the characteristics of learners with HFA, challenges faced by them in tertiary institutions and accommodations of their learning needs will be covered. Moreover, there will be a sharing from a tertiary student with HFA on the learning experience.

Biography: Dr Joanne Chi-yan Wong is a registered clinical psychologist and senior manager (clinical service) in SAHK who specializes in adult autistic spectrum disorders (ASD). Dr Wong and her colleagues developed the pioneer project for adults with high functioning autism (HFA) in Hong Kong in 2009, which is well received by service users and practitioners in the community. Dr Wong also collaborated with her multidisciplinary team to develop a comprehensive intervention framework for adults with ASD and learning disabilities. The framework addressing the unique needs and training context of adults with ASD and learning disabilities was published in a training manual in 2010. These initiatives received the recognition from the Social Welfare Department and a pilot project for adults with autism was subsequently launched in 2016. Dr Wong provides assessment and intervention, consultation, presents seminars, workshops, and runs training programs for educational and social welfare professionals, adults with ASD and parents.

Ms Agnes Pui-Ying Chan is a registered Social Worker and case manager in SAHK who is interested in working with HFA. She received the BSSSW degree in City University of Hong Kong in 2011 and MSocSc (Counselling) in The University of Hong Kong in 2016. Ms Chan provides case work, group work intervention and committed to networking with the tertiary institutions in order to enhance the well-being of HFA.

Time: 12:45 to 2:15 p.m. (light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.)
Venue: WLB211, The Wing Lung Bank Building for Business Studies, Shaw Campus
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TALES 12 – 24 May 2017 (Wednesday)

TALES 12 Topic Date Time Venue
1. The Arrival of Mobile Augmented Reality (AR) Learning in Asia 24 May 12:45 – 2:15 p.m. ACC209
Note: light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.
Title: The Arrival of Mobile Augmented Reality (AR) Learning in Asia
Facilitator/s: Professor Mark PEGRUM
(Graduate School of Education,
The University of Western Australia,
Perth, Australia)
Abstract: With the emergence of a new generation of mobile context-aware technologies, we can build on the personalised and collaborative learning facilitated by web 2.0 and social media, but we can go much further. There are greater opportunities than ever before to foreground authentic learning in everyday contexts, while simultaneously heightening student engagement through gamified approaches. To capitalise on this potential, it is essential for educators to develop appropriate mobile learning designs.

Drawing on Pegrum’s (2014) 3-Level Mobile Learning Framework, Burden & Kearney’s (2017) Mobile Pedagogical Framework, and Clandfield & Hadfield’s (2017) Weak & Strong Interaction Model, this presentation suggests that the optimal mobile learning designs should involve activities where the devices, the learners, and the learning experiences are all mobile; where the three dimensions of personalisation, collaboration, and authenticity are foregrounded; and where both weak and strong interaction are present.

The presentation goes on to illustrate the potential of mobile augmented reality (AR) language and literacy learning projects – in the form of games or gamified learning trails – many of which also incorporate elements of cultural exploration. After mentioning well-known North American and European examples, the presentation focuses on recent developments in gamified learning trails in the Asian region. It will include examples of projects from a range of countries such as Singapore, Indonesia and Hong Kong, where students learn collaboratively in real-world settings, while practising language, developing digital literacies and 21st century skills, and exploring culture.

In summary, the paper will demonstrate that with appropriate mobile learning designs, mobile devices can effectively become lenses on learning which open up a range of possibilities for personal, collaborative and authentic learning in everyday settings.

Biography: Professor Mark Pegrum is an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Education at The University of Western Australia, where he teaches in the areas of e-learning and mobile learning. His current research focuses on digital literacies, and the learning of language and literacy through mobile technologies. His recent books include “Brave New Classrooms: Democratic Education and the Internet”, co-edited with Joe Lockard, and published by Peter Lang in 2007; “From Blogs to Bombs: The Future of Digital Technologies in Education”, published by UWA Publishing in 2009; and “Digital Literacies”, co-authored with Gavin Dudeney and Nicky Hockly, and published by Pearson in 2013. He is now working on a new book on mobile language learning. He currently teaches in Perth, Hong Kong and Singapore and has given presentations and run seminars on e-learning in Australia and New Zealand, East and Southeast Asia, and the UK and Europe.

For more information, please see
http://markpegrum.com/about-mark-pegrum/biodata/

Time: 12:45 to 2:15 p.m. (light lunch from 12:30 – 12:45 p.m.)
Venue: ACC209
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