Sharing Sessions

Experience sharing from awards-winning colleagues:

11:15 am-12:30pm

 

1:45pm-3:00pm

 

Title:

Is Teaching Excellence in Conflict with Quality Research?

Speaker:


Abstract:

Professor Raymond Wai Yeung WONG
Department of Chemistry

Nowadays, university students are quite different from their fellows in the older generation pool, in terms of their relationships with teachers and their learning styles. How can we manage these changes in a positive, effective and fruitful way? There is no doubt that the role of an academic encompasses teaching, research and service and that balancing all three is a matter of good time management. As faculty members, we should place equal emphasis on teaching and research. I believe that teaching excellence and quality research are not in conflict, but rather, they complement each other and that it is indeed important to strengthen the teaching-research nexus.

In this talk, I shall share with participants some identified challenges and problems due to the change in student learning styles in today’s university education. I shall explain the nature of the problems, how we shall respond, and especially, how we can educate the new generation and enhance their study using different pedagogical approaches, from my own personal perspective. My experience on how to incorporate research into teaching and vice versa will be elaborated, with a particular relevance to the science discipline and chemistry education. I will also share with the audience how one can integrate teaching, research and services into an academic career.

  

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Title:

Story-Based Teaching: an Effective Way to Arouse Student’s Learning Interest?

Speaker:


Abstract:

Professor Chris Kong Chu WONG
Department of Biology

Engaging students actively in learning is one of major tasks to be achieved in the classroom. This is especially pertinent in a large class environment where students come from diverse backgrounds and have varying interests.  Teachers are, of course, usually well prepared, knowing what he/she is going to teach. But most of the time, students do not prepare for class; they just hope that something interesting will pop up in the classroom.  Hence there are usually expectation gaps between teachers and students.  A concept that may be seen as simple as “ABC” for a teacher could well be an essential piece of a jigsaw puzzle for students to be able to see the whole picture. Hence, if the teacher makes the wrong assumption that students already understand the basics and does not help students to make the necessary connection in class, it can result as a major information gap in the students and de-motivate their interests in learning.  Therefore the preparative work for teachers on how to address this issue is an important step to motivate student learning. In this talk, I would like to share my experience on using a story-based teaching approach that provides an overview or a layman summary to arouse student’s interest and engage them in learning.

  

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Title:

恩怨情仇一小時 ──淺談老師面前的陷阱

Speaker:


Abstract:

Ms Yin Ching WU
Language Centre

教室堙A老師自動站在權力的核心,我們會面對很多引誘。我們會認定學生所作的 "壞事" 是衝著自己而來的, 產生負面的情緒,甚至不自覺地假教育之名,暗暗計算怎樣向學生"報復"; 另一方面,當學生因為怕不及格而採用權宜之計、表面對我們千依百順,我們就會覺得他們已經受到了真正的教育。我們經常為了維護教室的秩序,就忘記了建立學生人生的秩序;為了維護自己的威信,就忘記建立學生的自信。我們經常為了 "做好這份工", 就忘記了怎樣才能真正地做好一個老師的工作。 如果我和我的人生無法讓學生產生任何羨慕,我就無法進行真正的教育了。

  

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Title:

How to Make Students Learn? An Experience Sharing

Speaker:


Abstract:

Dr Noel Yee Man SIU
Department of Marketing

How to make students learn? It is a very tough question to all lecturers especially if the class size is big. I will present my own cognitive and affective teaching and learning model based on my teaching experience. A suitable learning environment needs to be developed in each lesson.  Continuous interaction and engagement are significant drivers in the model.  It is believed that when students’ interest is stimulated, they will take initiative to learn.

  

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Title:

An Interdisciplinary GE Course from Preparation to Execution to Formative Assessment

Speaker:


Abstract:

Dr Kelvin Kai Wah LEE
Department of Communication Studies

In this presentation, I am going to share my team’s experience in preparing and executing a newly designed interdisciplinary, team-taught GE course named “Interactive Computing for Visual Communication”. The course idea was spawned from our belief that both visual literacy and computing literacy will be fundamental and critical for our students to stay competitive in the contemporary world despite what their own disciplines may be. However, these two capabilities are usually taught as distinct and non-overlapping subjects. Besides, there is a general misunderstanding that computing literacy demands strong mathematical skills while visual literacy requests gifted artistic talents. I will demonstrate how we tackled this problem from the initial idea formulation to the final course delivery using a holistic pedagogy to integrate these two domains of knowledge under a common framework.

I will first discuss the problems we foresaw and how we managed to shape our curriculum structure and course content in response to those challenges. I will then explain how we designed assessments to encourage multiple perspectives in problem solving and linking theory with practice. Case studies of student group projects will be used to illustrate the results of student collaborative learning and synthesis of the diversity of their knowledge and backgrounds. Finally, I will examine assessments of our pedagogy with both quantitative and qualitative data collected through the Formative Review Exercises (FRE).

  

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Title:

Solving Teaching and Learning Problems for Good Outcomes

Speaker:


Abstract:

Professor Yiu Wing LEUNG
Department of Computer Science

To achieve good teaching and learning outcomes, it is necessary but not sufficient to clearly write down and present your teaching materials. I believe that three problems should be solved:

  1. Most students have good learning motivation but some students do not.
  2. Most students have good learning capability but some students do not.
  3. Some students may swing between two extreme learning attitudes: over-confidence and under-confidence. When they can understand certain concepts at first glance, they may become over-confident, but in fact, they may have overlooked some in-depth issues. On the other hand, they may lack confidence because they did not grasp the concepts in the first instance. However, in reality, they could proceed with proper guidance.

In this presentation, I shall share my experience in tackling these three problems in order to facilitate students to learn more effectively.

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Title:

Do Not Turn Off Your Mobile Phone in My Lectures
iQlickers™ : A Low Cost Personal Response System

Speaker:


Abstract:

Professor Albert Wai Ming LEE
Department of Chemistry

In a large size class, interactions among students and with the instructor are usually very limited. When questions are posed, students’ responses are usually very passive. They are afraid to speak up and try to avoid embarrassments. The one-way dissemination of information from the instructor becomes the norm and students learn rather passively.

iQlickers™ was developed to remedy the situation and motivate students in class. Every student has a powerful wireless signal transmitter, the mobile phone. When a question (in multiple choice or opinion survey format) is posed to the class, students can comfortably send in their personal responses anonymously via their mobile phones. iQlickers™ can carry out a real time analysis, and display the statistics of the answers or opinions. It can further stimulate discussions and interactions among students. Cell phones are no longer just interpersonal communication necessities, they become handy teaching and learning tools in lectures via the iQlickers™ platform. In this presentation, I shall share some experience in using an earlier version of iQlickers™, participants will be invited to join as early adopters of this exciting tools to enhance interaction in class.

  

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Title:

Teaching to Learn: Thoughts on Some Issues in the Classroom

Speaker:


Abstract:

Professor Steve Zhong Shi GUO
Department of Journalism

As someone who has been teaching for some time, the following questions have puzzled me:
 Does it matter if…

  1. Your subject is hard or soft science/humanities?
  2. Your students are local or non-local?
  3. Your materials are existing or self-made?

To make things more complicated, the situation in the classroom changes from cohort to cohort. So:
What if…

  1. Students are not interested at all in the subject
  2. Students start to think like you
  3. You get the best and the worst students in the same room

I do not have simple answers to the above questions and scenarios, but I am sure that as educators, we can share our experience and make the classroom an engaging environment for active learning. This is what we shall do in this presentation session.

  

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Title:

How to Motivate Our Students and Ourselves?

Speaker:


Abstract:

Dr Alex Kun Luen LAU
Department of Accountancy and Law

Motivating Our Students –
Many students come to HKBU not as their first choice university, and this will affect their motivation to learn. How do we make them feel at home and find the joy of learning? How can we help them regain confidence and find their purpose for life? How can they discover their passion for learning? How can they learn how to learn? How can they be motivated to work hard? How can we assist our students in their journey to become whole persons?

Motivating Ourselves –
To be able to help others, first and foremost, we must keep ourselves motivated. How can we become a competent teacher? How can we become a competent researcher? How can we serve our community? How do we find our own rewards in our efforts?

I shall draw on my 17 years’ of teaching experience at HKBU to share on the above issues.

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