Teaching and Learning Experience Sharing (TALES) Seminar Series (2010/11 2nd)

2017/18 1st | 2016/17 2nd | 2016/17 1st | 2015/16 2nd | 2015/16 1st | 2014/15 2nd | 2014/15 1st |2013/14 2nd |2013/14 1st | 2012/13 2nd | 2012/13 1st | 2011/12 2nd | 2011/12 1st |
2010/11 2nd | 2010/11 1st | 2009/10

Introduction

The transition to the 4-year Degree coupled with the adoption of outcome-based teaching and learning (OBTL) present staff with significant challenges and opportunities for professional development. The Centre for Holistic Teaching and Learning (CHTL) has an important role to work with academic colleagues for the enhancement of student learning.

The TALES seminar series is designed to assist both new and experienced academic staff to adapt to the changing nature of the environment in which they work. TALES will help colleagues understand how our students learn, and provide resources, academic support and learning opportunities with OBTL and e-learning. The CHTL team will work with teachers to develop effective pedagogy in a holistic environment to enable our students to take proactive action to better manage their own learning.

Intended Learning Outcomes

TALES 2010-2011 is the first offering of the seminar series. A number of sessions have been scheduled with the aim of helping participants achieve three important intended learning outcomes.

At the end of TALES, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the HKBU Graduate Attributes and their importance in the OBTL implementation;
  2. Develop constructively aligned Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs), Teaching and Learning Activities (TLAs) and Assessment Methods (AMs) for their respective courses;
  3. Experiment with new and innovative teaching activities through the deployment of e-learning;

Series Outline

TALES 2010-2011 Date Time Venue
Powerpoint & Supplementary Notes
Evaluation Statistics
Video
1. Experience sharing on the use of Qualtrics at HKBU: How this can relate to your work? 15 Feb 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm ACC209 CHTL8100 Online Materials in BU eLearning

 

2. A Framework for Reflective Practice in Implementing Outcome-based Teaching and Learning 1 Mar 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm ACC209
3. Approaches to Student Engagement and Learning in General Education Courses 15 Mar 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm ACC209
4. Peer Review Writing Assignments and Critical Thinking 29 Mar 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm ACC209
5. Engaging Large Classes: Tips and Techniques for Engaging a Crowd 12 Apr 12:45 – 2:15 p.m. ACC209
6. Open Book Exams and Assessment in OBTL 3 May 12:45 – 2:15 p.m. ACC209
7. A “GE Frame of Mind” 17 May 12:45 – 2:15 p.m. ACC209
8. Lunch Conversation on: Spiritual Development of University Students 31 May 12:30 – 2:00 p.m. ACC209
9. Rubrics for Instructor and Peer Assessing: Some Down to Earth Sharing and Trouble Shooting 14 Jun 12:45 – 2:15 p.m. ACC209

(Note: Light Lunch will be provided)

Session Details

TALES 1 – Tuesday, 15 Feburary 2011

Title: Experience sharing on the use of Qualtrics at HKBU: How this can relate to your work?
Speaker/s: Colleagues from AR, School of Business and School of Communication
Abstract: Qualtrics is an industry-leading provider of enterprise feedback management and survey software solutions. It provides a platform for designing, distributing and evaluating survey results to keep the research process in-house and immediately actionable. At HKBU, we have now purchased an institution wide license for use by all colleagues. Thus, you may wish to know how Qualtrics can be used to assist your work. Our colleagues from the School of Communication and School of Business have been ardent users of this software and would like to share their experiences of using Qualtrics with you.
Time: 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm (light lunch from 12:30-1:00pm)
Venue: ACC 209
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TALES 2 – Tuesday, 1 March 2011

Title: A Framework for Reflective Practice in Implementing Outcome-based Teaching and Learning
Speaker/s: Prof.?John Biggs and Dr.?Catherine Tang
Abstract: With Outcome-based teaching and learning (OBTL) being implemented at HKBU for some time, our Schools and Faculties are at varying levels of implementation. To gauge our own progress, Professor John Biggs and Dr. Catherine Tang will deliver a seminar to illustrate how colleagues could reflect on their current stage of implementation of OBTL and how to advance to the next higher stage, both at the course and the programme/department levels, using a developmental framework for OBTL. In this TALES session, participants will reflect on their level of implementation of OBTL and identify one action that needs to be done to bring the implementation of OBTL to the next higher level.
Time: 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm (light lunch from 12:30-1:00pm)
Venue: ACC 209

Biography:

John Biggs has held Chairs in Education in Canada, Australia, and Hong Kong. He has published extensively on student learning and the implications of his research for teaching. His concept of constructive alignment, a form of outcomes-based education, is outlined in Teaching for Quality Learning in University (McGraw-Hill/Open University Press). The fourth edition, co-authored with Catherine Tang, is based on their experience in implementing constructive alignment in several universities in Hong Kong.
Catherine Tang is the former Head of Educational Development in the Hong Kong Institute of Education and in the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. Her main interest is in enhancing student learning, with a particular focus on the role of assessment, and the implications for staff development. She has been involved in large-scale teaching development projects in teaching and assessment. She co-authored with John Biggs the third edition of Teaching for Quality Learning in University (McGraw-Hill/Open University Press). She now consults with universities on implementing outcomes-based education.
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TALES 3 – Tuesday, 15 March 2011

Title: Approaches to Student Engagement and Learning in General Education Courses
Speaker/s: Prof. A. Reza Hoshmand
Director of General Education, HKBU
Abstract: This seminar/workshop will explore how intellectual depth, breadth, and adaptiveness are applied to examine, organize, and apply disciplinary ways of knowing to specific issues.? Furthermore, we will discuss how curricular and co-curricular activities contribute to active engagement in the classroom.
Time: 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm (light lunch from 12:30-1:00pm)
Venue: ACC 209
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TALES 4 – Tuesday, 29 March 2011

Title: Peer Review Writing Assignments and Critical Thinking
Speaker/s: Professor?David Skidmore
GE Fulbright Scholar, HKU
Abstract: Writing and critical thinking are closely related skills that are central to learning in almost any field of study. Research suggests that the writing skills of students improve when they do multiple drafts of an assignment and when they receive feedback based upon clear expectations. A peer review process that is guided by a critical thinking rubric not only helps authors as they revise initial drafts, but also encourages students to reflect upon the qualities of good writing by placing them in the role of reviewer. This workshop will provide a step-by-step guide to method of peer review. Guided by a critical thinking rubric, participants will gain hands-on experience with the method by reviewing several pieces of student writing in small groups.
Time: 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm (light lunch from 12:30-1:00pm)
Venue: ACC 209

Biography:

David Skidmore is a Professor in the Department of Politics and International Relations at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa (USA). He is currently a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Hong Kong (2010-11). He received his Ph.D. degree from Stanford University and taught at Hamilton College and the University of Notre Dame before arriving at Drake in 1989. During the 1996-97 academic year, he taught at the Johns Hopkins-Nanjing University Center for Chinese and American Studies in Nanjing, China. Skidmore serves as Director of the Drake University Center for Global Citizenship (currently on leave) and is past Director of the Drake Curriculum and First Year Seminar programs. His research and teaching interests lie in the areas of international political economy, American foreign policy and international relations theory. Skidmore is author, co-author or editor of six books including, most recently, a monograph titled The Unilateralist Temptation in American Foreign Policy (Routledge, 2011)
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TALES 5 – Tuesday, 12 April 2011

Title: Engaging Large Classes: Tips and Techniques for Engaging a Crowd
Speaker/s: Professor?Dayle Smith
GE Fulbright Scholar, HKBU
Abstract: Seeing your class size grow often results in a concern on how to lecture effectively with a large class and not lose the value of interactive learning. For this TALES, come acquire some new tools for your teaching toolbox. Learn and experience, first hand, tips and techniques for keeping students in a large classroom environment engaged and involved in their own learning.
Time: 12:45 pm – 2:15 pm (light lunch from 12:30-12:45pm)
Venue: ACC 209

Biography:

Professor Dayle Smith, Fulbright Visiting Scholar, Hong Kong Baptist University; Professor of Management, Department of Leadership, Organizations and Social Responsibility, School of Business; Former Chair of University of San Francisco GE Curriculum Committee
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TALES 6 – Tuesday, 3 May 2011

Title: Open Book Exams and Assessment in OBTL
Speaker/s: Professor Tony Hung
Professor, Language Centre & Adjunct Consultant, CHTL
Abstract: Traditionally, examinations take place in ‘closed book’, strictly supervised sessions, where students are denied access to any books or other reference materials. These conditions are imposed on the tacit assumption that the main purpose of an exam is to test the students’ ability to recall and regurgitate a body of knowledge unaided.

Such conditions are at odds with the goals of modern education, which aims at producing graduates who can think critically, analyse and solve problems, access and use information effectively, and be independent lifelong learners. They also go against conditions in real life, where (far from being denied access to information) everything is done to ensure that we have access to all the information we need in our work. Closed book exams are also clearly not in the spirit of the best practice in the outcomes-based teaching and learning (OBTL), which emphasizes higher-level cognitive skills rather than mere rote-learning and regurgitation. Worst of all, closed book exams encourage a certain mentality and approach to examinations, characterized by ‘cramming’ and memorization, and (in extreme cases) cheating.

The present talk provides a detailed justification and illustration of Open Book exams, and shows how it can work hand-in-hand with OBTL to assess high-level cognitive outcomes, where knowledge and information are a means rather than an end in itself.

Time: 12:45 pm – 2:15 pm (light lunch from 12:30-12:45pm)
Venue: ACC 209
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TALES 7 – Tuesday, 17 May 2011

Title: A “GE Frame of Mind”
Speaker/s: Professor?Dayle Smith
GE Fulbright Scholar, HKBU
Abstract: This session explores the unique characteristics of a GE course. Come discuss different approaches in delivering GE courses and walk away with a few tips for making the GE experience meaningful for you and your students. Strategies for high impact classroom practices will be discussed. Colleagues will dialog about pedagogical innovation and how to create a “GE frame of mind” making GE desired… not just required.
Time: 12:45 pm – 2:15 pm (light lunch from 12:30-12:45pm)
Venue: ACC 209
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TALES 8 – Tuesday, 31 May 2011

Title: Lunch Conversation on: Spiritual Development of University Students
Speaker/s: Professor?Edmond Ko
Director of the Center for Engineering Education Innovation & Adjunct Professor
The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST)
Abstract: Research has shown that a student’s spiritual growth enhances many university outcomes,?inter alia, academic performance, psychological well-being, leadership development and satisfaction with the university. Yet when we talk about educating our students, more often than not, we refer narrowly to the discipline knowledge or professional skills that faculty members can help our students learn. So do faculty have a role in helping students develop spirituality and, if so, how? What could be done to help students answer questions such as, who they are, or what kind of society they want to have a role in creating?

Based on the recent work by Austin et al., we offered a course in the Arts and Cultural Programme (ACEP) last semester to help students explore their spiritual development. Through a series of four workshops, participating students started with identifying the values they held most dear to themselves individually, and finished with developing a plan to realise their personal and professional goals. This pioneering trial turned out to be an eye-opening experience for both the participants and the facilitator.

With the Whole Person Education ethos central to our University’s mission, how should we incorporate spiritual development into our academic and co-curricular activities? In TALES 8, we will share our experience and insights gained from the ACEP workshops. Most importantly, we invite you to share your views and opinions on whether we, university educators, are ready to take up such an important responsibility. With classes over and examination markings almost done, please join us to have a conversation on this pertinent education issue.

Time: 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm (light lunch from 12:30-12:45pm)
Venue: ACC 209

Biography:

Edmond Ko is Director of the Center for Engineering Education Innovation and Adjunct Professor of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST).? Prior to that, he served as Vice-President (Undergraduate Education), Dean of Students, and Professor (Chair) of Chemistry at City University of Hong Kong (CityU), and as the Vice Provost for Education and Professor of Chemical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University.? As the key person charged to improve undergraduate education at Carnegie Mellon and CityU, Professor Ko has directed activities in student recruitment and admissions, student development, student residence, curriculum design, quality assurance, and faculty development.
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TALES 9 – Tuesday, 14 June 2011

Title: Rubrics for Instructor and Peer Assessing: Some Down to Earth Sharing and Trouble Shooting
Speaker/s: Dr. Jan Connelly
Associate Professor, Department of Education Studies, HKBU
Abstract: Carrying out assessment of tasks/activities using rubrics is a common practice in schools so academics in the field of education have been using them in tertiary education for over a decade now.? This presentation will involve some basic concepts about their use, some discussion of the advantages they offer over other means of assessment and it will also tackle the step by step process of how to construct rubrics to ensure that the assessment task they are used on align with the learning outcomes of the course.

However, not everything in ‘the garden of rubrics’ is rosy – so this presentation will also share what can go wrong and how rubrics can be used ineffectively – and how in the process of helping students engage with peer assessment – they can be both productive and counterproductive.

As this is a sharing session there will be lots of opportunity for discussion and if you have an exemplary rubric that works well for you bring it along to share with others.

Time: 12:45 pm – 2:15 pm (light lunch from 12:30-12:45pm)
Venue: ACC 209
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All are welcome. For enquiries, please contact us at chtl@hkbu.edu.hk. As seats are limited, it would be very helpful if you could register your attendance at here.