Keynote Speaker

Professor Thomas ANGELO

Pro Vice-Chancellor (Curriculum and Academic Planning), Founding Director of the Curriculum,Teaching and Learning Centre, and Professor of Higher Education at La Trobe University. In 2009, he also became Director of La Trobe's Design for Learning Project, an ambitious four-year revision and redesign of the entire undergraduate curriculum.

Keynote Description

Workshop Description

Keynote Description

Less Assessment, More Learning: Aligning Graduate Attributes, Outcomes and Criteria with Course-Level Assessment and Feedback

Time : 9:30 am - 10:30 am

Venue : WLB109, Lam Woo International Conference Centre, Shaw Campus (View Map)


All of you at HKBU have invested a great deal of time, thought and energy in designing and developing your new 4-year curriculum.
One way to enhance the return on that investment is to ensure that assessment of student learning at every level is as well-aligned, effective and efficient as possible.  Through this interactive keynote, we will consider practical ways to help students make meaningful connections between their everyday coursework, program outcomes, criteria, and graduate attributes without creating more work for teaching staff.  Key concepts demonstrated include: strategic alignment, backward design, and cognitive loading – as well as the “parrot” and “bus” tests for assessment quality.
You can expect to take away at least 2-3 ideas you can use.

  

 

 

Workshop Description

Assessment and Feedback for Learning: Practical, Research-based Strategies

Time : 3:15 pm - 5:15 pm

Venue : WLB109, Lam Woo International Conference Centre, Shaw Campus (View Map)


The decisions we make about what and how to assess greatly influence what, how much, and how deeply our students study and learn.  All teachers realize that giving feedback to students on their assessment performance is particularly critical to their learning and success. But most of us also realize how time-consuming, difficult, and frustrating the assessment-feedback process can be – particularly when students fail to make good use of (or even read) our comments.  This session presents sometimes counter-intuitive research findings on effective feedback, along with simple, practical, time-saving strategies for improving the odds that our feedback is read/heard, understood, valued and used. You will try out at five simple, powerful assessment and feedback strategies, and leave with two or three to apply immediately. A handout with related guidelines, examples, materials and references for follow up will be provided.

 

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